Resources

United Nations – Sustainable Development

The UN has a range of resources on the Sustainable Development Goals, including a Take Action webpage and the Lazy Person’s Guide to Saving the World – a guide to what the average person can do to support the Sustainable Development Goals.

The UN’s SDGs in Action smart phone app helps you learn about the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, get news on your favourite goals, find out what you can do to achieve them, create your own events and invite others to join you in sustainable actions and events.

Visit the UN’s Sustainable Development website for more information.


SDG Guides

  • The SDG Compass provides guidance on how to align business strategy to the SDGs and measure and manage contribution. Developed by GRI, the UN Global Compact (UNGC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), the guide incorporates feedback from companies, government agencies, academic institutions and civil society organisations worldwide.
  • WBCSD’s CEO Guide to the SDGsis a resource aimed at galvanising engagement from global business leaders in relation to the SDGs.
  • PwC has created a Global Goals Business Navigator to help business understand, assess and prioritise the SDGs.
  • KPMG and the UN Global Compact have developed the SDG Industry Matrix, a series of industry specific ideas for action and practical examples for each SDG.
  • Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) ranks the top 500 globally listed companies on their human rights policies, processes and performance. A comprehensive draft list of indicators is helpful to companies working with broad human rights.
  • The Human Rights and Business Country Guide provides country-specific guidance to help companies respect human rights and contribute to development. The guide provides a systematic overview of human rights issues for particular attention by business and provides guidance on how to ensure respect for human rights in company operations or in collaboration with local suppliers and business partners.
  • The Human Rights Compliance Assessment (HRCA) is a diagnostic tool designed to help business detect potential human rights violations caused by their operations on employees, local residents and all other stakeholders.
  • The Guide to Human Rights Impact Assessment and Management (HRIAM) enables businesses to identify, understand, and evaluate actual or potential human rights impacts of a project at each stage of development and operations. This approach links human rights assessment to existing management processes.
  • The Global Impact Investing Network’s Impact Reporting & Investment Standards (IRIS) is a free-to-use catalogue of generally-accepted performance metrics used by leading impact investors to measure social, environmental, and financial success, evaluate deals and grow credibility.
  • The Social Hotspots Database (SHDB) project offers an online database that allows users to browse data on social risks by sector, country, or risk theme. There are 227 countries and 57 economic sectors to choose from. The data comprehensively addresses social issues on human rights, working conditions, community impacts and governance issues, via a set of nearly 150 risk indicators grouped within 22 themes. Risks are also expressed, whenever relevant, by country and sector.
  • The UN Global Compact – Oxfam Poverty Footprint assessment tool enables business and civil society partners to understand impacts on poverty all along a company’s value chain. It can help establish pro-poor business strategies, and promotes greater corporate transparency and meaningful stakeholder engagement.
  • The Children’s Rights in Impact Assessment  tool allows businesses to assess their policies and processes as they relate to the responsibility to respect children’s rights and their commitment to support children’s rights.
  • Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) ranks the top 500 globally listed companies on their human rights policies, processes and performance. Business can use a tool that includes a comprehensive draft list of indicators, helpful to companies working with broad human rights.
  • The Human Rights and Business Country Guide provides country-specific guidance to help companies respect human rights and contribute to development. The guide provides a systematic overview of human rights issues for particular attention by business and provides guidance on how to ensure respect for human rights in company operations or in collaboration with local suppliers and business partners.
  • The Human Rights Compliance Assessment (HRCA) is a diagnostic tool designed to help business detect potential human rights violations relating to their operations, on employees, local residents and all other stakeholders.
  • The Global Impact Investing Network’s Impact Reporting & Investment Standards (IRIS) is a free-to-use catalogue of generally-accepted performance metrics used by leading impact investors to measure social, environmental, and financial success, evaluate deals and grow credibility.
  • The Measuring Impact – How Business Accelerates the Sustainable Development Goals   report shares early learnings on private sector support for the SDGs.
  • The Social Hotspots Database (SHDB) project offers an online database that allows users to browse data on social risks by sector, country, or risk theme. There are 227 countries and 57 economic sectors to choose from. The data comprehensively addresses social issues on human rights, working conditions, community impacts and governance issues, via a set of nearly 150 risk indicators grouped within 22 themes. Risks are also expressed, whenever relevant, by country and sector.
  • The Understanding and Measuring Women’s Economic Empowerment This is a conceptual guide rather than an operational tool kit. The general framework requires adaptation to meet the needs of specific projects.

External resources

For civil society, universities, schools and individuals

Monash Sustainable Development Institute

Monash University’s Sustainable Development Institute runs the Take One Step digital engagement platform. Developed by the Institute in 2015 Take One Step encourages participants to learn more about the SDGs and share solutions to global challenges via individual action and commitment.

Visit the Take One Step website for more information.

World’s Largest Lesson

The World’s Largest Lesson is an initiative of Project Everyone in partnership with UNICEF. It introduces the Sustainable Development Goals to children and young people through a series of lesson plans and downloadable classroom materials and unites them in action.

Visit the World’s Largest Lesson website for more information.

Project Everyone

Project Everyone, devised by Richard Curtis (filmmaker and founder of Comic Relief), is a not-for-profit agency working on campaigns, content and events which ladder up to the achievement of the Goals.

Visit the Project Everyone website for more information.

The Global Goals for Sustainable Development

Project Everyone has a Global Goals website, with information on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, news on upcoming events and a Media Centre with downloadable images and videos.

Visit the Global Goals website for more information.


Sustainable Development Solutions Network

The Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilises scientific and technical expertise from academia, civil society, and the private sector in support of sustainable development problem solving at local, national, and global scales.

SDSN Australia/Pacific fosters global SDSN activities within the region by developing and promoting solutions, policies and public education. Universities can also sign up to the University Commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Visit the SDSN Australia/Pacific website for more information.

SDG Academy

The Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)’s SDG Academy creates and curates free, graduate-level courses on sustainable development for students around the world. The SDG Academy’s courses are fully interactive, so you can meet, debate and learn from both the global faculty of sustainable development experts and fellow students.

Visit the SDG Academy website for more information.

Getting started with the SDGs in Universities

Getting started with the SDGs in Universities is an initiative of SDSN Australia/Pacific in collaboration with the Australasian Campuses Towards Sustainability (ACTS), the global SDSN, and Australian and New Zealand universities. The tool helps universities, higher education institutions, and the academic sector in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific to accelerate their contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Visit the SDSN Getting started with the SDGs in Universities website for more information.


Engaging business

The Ministerial Statement on engaging the private sector in aid and development (August 2015) sets out the Government’s commitment to enhance collaboration with the private sector to address development challenges and identifies the private sector as an essential partner to achieving sustainable development outcomes in our region.

The Business Partnerships Platform is an agency wide mechanism, where DFAT and the private sector are working together in a flexible way to address development challenges.

DFAT has a partnership with the Global Compact Network Australia (GCNA), enhancing our capacity to engage with businesses whose interests align with advancing the Sustainable Development Goals. Businesses can use the GCNA’s Australian SDGs Hub for Business as a resource to engage with and contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals.

So far, over 30 leading Australian CEOs have signed the Global Compact Network Australia’s CEO Statement of Support for the Sustainable Development Goals. We are also partners with the Shared Value Project, allowing us to collaborate with businesses aiming at delivering sustainable social impact while achieving commercial returns.

Major Australian companies are incorporating the SDGs into their planning and reporting.

In the Asia Pacific region DFAT  supports the Business and Sustainable Development Commission (BSDC) to engage with CEO stakeholders to promote the Sustainable Development Goals. The BSDC has developed an online tool – the SDG Business Hub – to help businesses navigate the 2030 Agenda.

Information on civil society and universities on the 2030 Agenda

Global Compact Network Australia

The business-led Global Compact Network Australia (GCNA) brings together signatories to the UN Global Compact, including a number of Australia’s leading companies, non-profits and universities, to advance corporate sustainability and the private sector’s contribution to sustainable development.

Visit the GCNA website and the Australian SDGs Hub for Business website for more information.

Australia Post

Australia Post – one of Australia’s largest companies – has mapped the current and potential impact that its business operations can have on achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. It’s three-part video series, Sustainability and your small business, takes you through the basics of sustainability, what it means for small businesses and how to implement sustainable business practices.

Australia Post and the Banksia Foundation have also issued a white paper, Small Business: Making sustainability part of every day, which highlights the barriers and drivers to sustainability, along with the key characteristics of small businesses that are leaders in sustainability and the lessons they’ve learned along the way.

Visit the Australia Post website for more information

Business and Sustainable Development Commission

The Business and Sustainable Development Commission (BSDC) aims to make a powerful business case for achieving a sustainable, inclusive economy. Its flagship report, Better Business, Better World, maps the economic prize for companies that align with the Sustainable Development Goals, and shows how to achieve them.

Visit the BSDC website for more information.

SDG Business Hub

The SDG Business Hub provides easy access to resources, tools, case studies on the SDGs.

Visit the SDG Business Hub website for more information.


Collaboration on Projects

uBegin connects people with the aim of solving challenges together, providing links to resources and an online collaboration space to meet the needs of your project.


Commonwealth Government Departments

Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet

For information about the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet’s engagement with the SDGs

For information about the Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet’s engagement with stakeholders on SDG 5 (Gender Equality)

For information about the Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet’s engagement with stakeholderson SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities)

Australian Bureau of Statistics

For information about the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ engagement with the SDGs

Department of Health

For information about the Department of Health’s engagement with stakeholders on the SDGs

Department of Education and Training

For information about the Department of Education and Training’s engagement with stakeholders on the SDGs

Department of the Environment and Energy

For information about the Department of the Environment and Energy’s engagement with stakeholders on the SDGs

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trading

Information on how DFAT is engaging with the Global Compact Network Australia and Australian business on the 2030 Agenda


Goal-specific resources

Goal 1: No poverty

Goal 2: Zero Hunger

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

Goal 5: Gender Equality

  • Gender Equality Principles self-assessment: A diagnostic tool developed to assist companies in implementing and promoting the GEP. For internal use only (there is no final grade or score assigned to users), it allows companies to establish a baseline, identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement, leverage extensive indicators and resources, and set goals and objectives to strengthen gender-related policies, practices, and organisational culture. Progress can also be measured and compared by different divisions and over time.
  • The Social Hotspots Database (SHDB) project offers an online database that allows users to browse data on social risks by sector, country, or risk theme. There are 227 countries and 57 economic sectors to choose from. The data comprehensively addresses social issues on human rights, working conditions, community impacts and governance issues, via a set of nearly 150 risk indicators grouped within 22 themes. Risks are also expressed, whenever relevant, by country and sector.

Goal 6: Clean water and sanitation

Goal 11: Sustainable cities and communities

  • The United Nations’ Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) Disaster Resilience Scorecard for Cities provides a set of assessments that allows cities to understand how resilient they are to natural disasters. 
  • Green Building Council of Australia’s Green Star is a certification process and rating system for the design, construction and operation of sustainable buildings, fitouts and communities.
  • The City Resilience Framework, developed by Arup with support of the Rockefeller Foundation, is a lens to understand the complexity of cities and the drivers of their resilience.

Goal 12: Responsible consumption and production

  • Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Circular Economy 100 helps organisations develop new opportunities and realise their circular economy ambitions faster.
  • Sustainable Apparel Coalition’s Higg Index, an apparel and footwear industry self-assessment standard for assessing environmental and social sustainability through the supply chain.
  • The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review report helps businesses to proactively develop strategies to manage business risks and opportunities arising from their company’s dependence and impact on ecosystems.
  • Sedex Global is a not-for-profit membership organisation with the world’s largest collaborative platform for sharing responsible sourcing data on supply chains.
  • Eco-Synergy is a design philosophy combined with a set of analytic tools. It helps businesses systematically identify beneficial synergies between their operations and surrounding ecological resources.
  • The Food Loss and Waste Protocol is an accounting and reporting standard for quantifying food loss and waste. It enables countries, companies and other organisations to account for food loss and waste in a credible, practical and internationally consistent manner.
  • The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 provides the consumer goods and packaging industries with a common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.
  • Eat.Save Guidance version 1.0 raises awareness about the need to reduce food waste.

Goal 14: Life below water

  • Clean Shipping Index allows cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators. It can be used by transport buyers to calculate and minimise their environmental footprint.
  • The Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT for Business) is a biodiversity screening tool for a range of financial institutions, including the International Finance Corporation, The World Bank, and a number of Equator Principles Financial Institutions and OECD Export Credit Agencies. It integrates information on globally recognised biodiversity, drawing upon the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • The Interactive River Basin Database allows businesses to find basins by Latitude/Longitude points and by country.

Goal 15: Life on land

  • The ARtificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) is a networked software technology that seeks to quantify the benefits of nature to societies to help better-informed policy decisions.
  • Biodiversity Risk & Opportunity Assessment (BROA): Companies with agricultural supply chains use BROA to assess impacts and dependence on biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes, Identify and prioritise risks and opportunities, work with local stakeholders and create action and monitoring plans.
  • The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review is a structured methodology that helps companies develop strategies to manage business risks and opportunities arising from dependence and impact on ecosystems.
  • Data Basin is a science-based mapping and analysis platform that supports learning, research, and sustainable environmental stewardship.
  • Eco4Biz provides ecosystem services and biodiversity tools to support decision making, and a decision tree framework.
  • The Ecosystem Services Review in Impact Assessment (ESR for IA) provides practical instructions to environmental and social practitioners on how to incorporate ecosystem services throughout environmental and social impact assessment.
  • Global Forest Watch (GFW) is a free, simple-to-use interactive online forest monitoring and alert system designed to help improve forest management and conservation. GFW provides timely and precise information about the status of forest landscapes worldwide, including near-real-time alerts showing suspected locations of recent tree cover loss.
  • The Guide to Corporate Ecosystem Valuation is a framework to enable companies to consider the actual benefits and value of the ecosystem services they depend upon and impact, giving them new information and insights to include in business planning and financial analysis. It supports improved business decision-making by helping align the financial, ecological and societal objectives.
  • The Guide to investing in locally controlled forestry is a tool for practical action – providing guidance on how to structure enabling investments and prepare the ground for asset investments that yield acceptable returns and reduced risk, not only for investors, but also for local forest right-holders, national governments and society at large.
  • The High Conservation Value (HCV) Resource Network offers a process in which High Conservation Values are identified, managed and monitored in forestry and agricultural production. HCVs are biological, ecological, social or cultural values which are considered outstandingly significant or critically important, at the national, regional or global level.
  • The Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT for Business) is a biodiversity screening tool for financial institutions, including the International Finance Corporation, The World Bank, and a number of Equator Principles Financial Institutions and OECD Export Credit Agencies. The test allows for rapid review against their respective environmental and social standards and safeguards.
  • Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) is a suite of software models used to map and value the goods and services from nature that sustain and fulfill human life. InVEST enables decision makers to assess quantified tradeoffs associated with alternative management choices and to identify areas where investment in natural capital can enhance human development and conservation.
  • Normative Biodiversity Metric (NBM) is a methodology to apply a measure of ecosystem pristineness combined with a measure of endangered species presence to assess and score company-owned land. Businesses report on changes to the biodiversity score on their land.
  • The Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit provides guidance for financial institutions to better manage risks related to investments in forestry and industrial projects that have forest impacts
  • The Sustainable Procurement Guide for Wood and Paper-based Products is a guide to help sustainability and procurement managers make informed choices on the forest products they buy. It identifies key issues that underpin responsible procurement of wood and paper-based products, provides resources and advice that address each issue. It can be used to develop and implement procurement policies that reduce risk and create transparency throughout supply chains and ultimately support sustainable forest management.
  • The WBCSD’s Global Water Tool is a free, publicly available resource for identifying corporate water risks and opportunities. It includes a workbook (data input, inventory by site, key reporting indicators, metrics calculations), a mapping function to plot sites with datasets, and Google Earth interface for spatial viewing. The Global Water Tool has also been customised to individual sectors (versions available for download on the WBCSD website). The India Water Tool (IWT) is also available on the website.

Goal 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions

  • The UN Global Compact’s Business for Peace initiative provides a platform for businesses dedicated to catalysing collaborative action to advance peace.
  • The UN Global Compact’s Business for the Rule of Law Framework provides guidance on how business can respect and support the rule of law as a complement to government action.
  • The Anti-Bribery Checklist is based on Transparency International’s Business Principles for Countering Bribery and is designed for business to assess their anti-corruption policy, implementation and monitoring and review mechanisms. It should be read in conjunction with Transparency International’s Self-Evaluation Tool.
  • The Bribe Payers Index ranks the world’s wealthiest countries by the propensity of their firms to bribe abroad and looks at which industrial sectors are the worst offenders. The index is based on the views of thousands of senior business executives from developed and developing countries.

Does your organisation have a project to include?